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. a find in the war of drugs. authorities shut down a tunnel between the u.s. and mexico >> a deadly storm system creating problems across the country as it dumps a foot of rain in some parts leading to severe flooding. . >>> welcome to al jazeera america. there are new revelations about just how far the national security agency has gone to spy on internet users. revelations that have reportedly led twitter to set up new types of enciption to protect messages from snoops, something google spent millions doing. facebook is trying to stay a step ahead. now the senate intelligence committee is set to tighten the rules. >> these are the slides leaked by whistleblower edward snowden in june. as long as the national security agency or the federal bureau of investigation are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are all theirs for the searching. this >> carefully worded denials followed from the companies, arguing that they give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case-by-case basis. these assurances have
. >> the fed used to have reserves and one of the changes is that now they can pay it and they look at the new tool of the interest rate. >> and number of people to put this in context a number of people have been arguing one of the problems in terms of funding investment in the private sector is that the fed is taking the money out of the system by paying interest on reserves. i think there is very little evidence that that is the case created the design of the policy was primarily to make sure that there was control over the rate to keep the fund rate is much narrower than they had been. remember that as a time when it was all over the place. it seemed to have worked quite effectively, and i think the evidence to that policy is pretty positive. the evidence against it in terms of its long-term effect is minimal. that doesn't mean that it couldn't be used to harm the private sector by taking the money out of the economy because they have discretion on the rate by which it pays for those funds obviously by the race that would be too high you could do a lot of damage but i don't think there is
in the middle east. >>> this is free solo climbing or scaling a mountain without a rope. to us non-climbers, the best free soloist in the world will tell us what it's like to climb a mountain with nothing but your bear hands and chalk. welcome to "consider this." new jersey governor chris christie with an historic win in a big blue state. and in virginia agency race it was a suspenseful night with a race between a democrat and a conservative republican. it's where tea partyers got top billing. we'll take a sneak peek of staying power tha , and the seismic shift to the left. i'm joined which jeff warren, and bill snyder, professor at george washington university. they're both in our washington, d.c. studios, and here in studio with me is tom doherty, former senior adviser to george pataki. bill, let's start with you. chris christie, a big win. but when you look at the exit polls in a hypothetical match up to hillary clinton he would lose in his own state. >> it tells us that new jersey is still a blue state, and hillary clinton is still a very popular figure there. look, christie wo
think it is useful but not absolutely essential to the overall relationship. just getting the team together on the american side, which hampered its first few months, but i would not myself think that this was critical to the issue of inking forward. i think that has to be done to some degree by the prime minister and the president. they have little time together, so it is very much something that needs to be included in the regular meetings at the foreign secretary level and then at the theor official level, like political director and others in the foreign office. you have this overview of the overall relationship. >> well, that takes me rather neatly onto my next point, which is that sometimes we make a mistake in this country in seeing american foreign-policy as being monolithic, because you have a number of sources. you have got the white house, that you mentioned. you have got the state department. you have got the senate, the foreign relations committee. c, and youot the ns have got the pentagon. do you think that we have difficulty here in formulating policy when there are
>> in addition to announcing a review of u.s. ties, the pakistani government also summoned the u.s. ambassador to warn of a standoff and less drone attacks ceased. also financing the strike from the leading pakistani opposition leader imran kahn proposed a ban on nato supply trucks inside pakistan. ofn accused the u.s. sabotaging the peace talks. >> i feel sad that just as the dialogue was about to start take, those who are still part in the talks, were killed yesterday. >> the pakistani taliban has sayed asly picked kahn its new leader. the suspect in friday's armed attack at the los angeles international airport could face the death penalty for shooting dead a transportation security administration officer and wounding five other people. is charged with murdering a federal officer and committing violence at an international airport. the head of the police at lax described the attack. >> at 9:20 this morning, in individual came into terminal 3 of this airport, pulled an assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire in the terminal. he proceeded up into the screening area wher
in the initial days of the troubled website. >> a stunning admission by the u.s., john kerry admits some surveillance has gone too far, just as giant tech companies push back against the government. >> the bottom line is people are going to go hungry. >> the federal cuts making it harder for struggling families to put food on the table. >> a threatened species makes a comeback. the salmon population is pushed toward record numbers. >> good morning, good to have you with us on this friday with that welcome to aljazeera america. >> for more than a month now, the obama administration has been saying how many millions of people have visited the health care website, but they have kept quiet about exactly how many have enrolled, insisting they do not have those numbers. >> new documents show the white house has a pretty good idea. >> even the president admits healthcare.gov has problems. >> the website is too slow, too many people have gotten stuck. >> just how many people have gotten stuck or how many ever enrolled are figures the obama administration has been denying the public for days now.
minister argued for a --e active western european we had theink example of the use of chemical weapons in syria and it was the american president who had to persuade prime minister cameron. prime minister cameron already saw the need for action. in both countries, public opinion was extremely cautious. a majority was opposed to any form of direct military action, which is what came through here. that was ultimately the reason why american policy evolved as it did. even before the american position eve alt, my immediate reaction -- evolved, my immediate reaction was that it the type ofange relationship we have with america in one go. watching the american reaction in the days ahead for the president felt it necessary to consult congress. had there been a congressional vote, it it would have been touch and go. numbers and the house looked to be negative. in terms of having the u.k. and ,he u.s. at a popular level there is quite a shared set of views in the world we are in after afghanistan. the house of commons vote as having a negative vote on the u.k.-u.s. relations. the u.s. was in th
. >> those are the headlines. "america tonight" is up next. and you can get us online any time. weed outnumber the locals. a new home on the rage. >> we want to be individual, we don't want the government to take care of us. >>> a message about shared faith and common values. >> we talk about family, we talk about education, we talk about self dependence. we talk about opportunities for american dream. >> and flowing straight into trouble. a new front in the contest between energy and the environment. >> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. will they stay or will they go? it is a fair question on this day before off-year elections in many communities around the country truly is an off-off election year, races which might not attract a lot of attention in any other year. but this year political divisions on many levels make quite a few races be bellwethers. what we currently call colorado where secessionists want to form a new state. might not have much of a success but it points to a bigger picture of divide. the great sky of colorado's rural community. chris bu
. statehood can be a fiction that hides dangers lurking beneath. all of these challenges will be with us for the foreseeable future. there is not a short-term vision to these are a first century threats. we must manage through these realities as we engage these complex problems. staying focused on our long-term interests and long-term objectives and outcomes. the imperfect outcomes may be the most we can expect, working our way toward the higher ground of possible solutions. leveraging all aspects of our power, we must multiply and enhance our efforts by working through coalitions of common interest like nato. this is in fact our future. just as we have done since world war ii, but it now may be more essential than ever before. while these challenges are not america's responsibilities alone, they will demand america's continued engagement. no other nation, no other nation has the will, the power, the cast the, "he, and a network of alliances to lead international community in addressing them. however, sustaining our leadership will increasingly depend not only on the extent of an great p
against protesters armed with rocks. ♪ >> good evening, and thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. one of the best names in the treatment of dementia patients sits in a bigger debate, pharmaceutical companies, prescriptions and how doctors choose the medication they provide. johnson and johnson m settled about the government from 2002 to 2003 there was an off-labor use of the drug not approved by the fda. it has been since approved for dementia and young patients as well. and it has been an enormously successful product. it had $24.2 billion from 2002 to 2010, but it was the off-label period that raised alarm. the marketing effort including compensation to doctors amounted to reckless endangerment of patients young and old. >> the kick packs undermines adjustment of healthcare providers. it provides incentive to increase the use of drugs potentially putting the health of some patients at risk. the companies put down the risk of risperdol. put simply the alleged conduct is shameful and it is unacceptable. it displayed a reckless indifference to the safety of the american people, and it
and capacity to control the impulses was virtually nonexistent. the genetic evidence was used to challenge it saying the person didn't have the necessary mental state. to provide a novel serious -- that the person's own self provoked him rather than some external person, totally novel theory; right? and try to mitigate. didn't work in this case, and hasn't worked in a lot of cases because the objective circumstances are different than the neurological evidence. evidence of planning as we ordinarily understand it by a guy, taking it to a place, pulling a trigger saying die all right. those objective things lint face a lot of neurological ens. this just tells you -- the red bar is bad for the criminal defenses. the blue bar is good for the criminal defenses. whenever you are in the room you should see a lough red. you should see a little bit of blue and the little bit of blue you should see is around mitigation. in effective assistance of counsel mitigation, and soming aggravation. in general, it's not working we again, remember it's a subset of cases. it may be more effective i
notice we have the scale of sheets that are on your table. they are reviews. we use them -- we review them very carefully afterwards. that is why we think our programs have improved over the years because we listen to what you have to say and try to give you the type of programs you really are interested in. we would also have another announcement. our committee will be having on friday november 15 an address addressed by ambassador marc grossman. he is the vice-chairman of the cohen group. he will be speaking about the diplomatic campaign in afghanistan and pakistan. he will be at the university club at 8:00 a.m. on november 15 so please take out your black areas in iphones. we also have another speaker. the senior adviser for transnational homeland security and counterterrorism program at the center for strategic and international studies. that will be wednesday december 4. also at 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and that also will be held at the university club which is on 16th street in the northwest. i also have a very special announcement. as many of you know the aba standing committee i
with us. being with us. i'm joie chen. i'm joie chen. as we begin this holiday most as we begin this holiday most closely associated with closely associated with celebration, with abundance and celebration, with abundance and even excess, it might be a even excess, it might be a little unfair of us to ask you little unfair of us to ask you to stop and consider the worry to stop and consider the worry and the anxiety of many american and the anxiety of many american families on the periphery of the families on the periphery of the economic safety net. economic safety net. but it is an important moment we but it is an important moment we believe to think about the believe to think about the growing need of the many growing need of the many americans who are faced every americans who are faced every day with a choice between paying day with a choice between paying basic bills or feeding their basic bills or feeding their families. families. what do you do when you can't what do you do when you can't fill the fridge, when you're not fill the fridge, when you're not sure how you feed
you, my friend. >>> that is all the time i have for you today. thank you so much for being with us. "around the world" starts right now. >>> hundreds of passengers and crew members scram babling to get to safety after smoke fills the cabin on board their plane. paramedics treated people at the scene, on the tarmac in montreal. all the details on that scary moment in a live report coming up. >>> then they criticized the u.s. for spying on world leaders, but it turns out brazil was doing the same thing. plus, we're learning more about the new jersey mall shooter. we'll hear from someone who was inside the mall during his shooting spree. hello, everyone. i'm in for suzanne malveaux. >>> today is election day across the united states. some very key races we're going to be looking at in many states and cities around the country. voters are casting ballots to pick mayors and governors and also decide some pretty important ballot initiatives. now, as i mentioned, some key races are taking place. they could offer clues to the presidential contest in 2016 and also the next congressional ele
-3881. independence and all others, (202) 585-5883. send us a tweet at @cspanwj. .-mail us, journal@c-span.org let me begin with a poll taken energy and- the environment trade-offs. from an april 10 poll, americans are still divided on this energy environment trade-off. americans divide evenly when asked whether the u.s. should prioritize energy production, or environmental protection, 45%, when goals conflict. from 2000 one to 2008, americans came down on the side of the environment. since 2009, they have been divided or showed a preference for energy production. aside from a shift for the environment in the late of the gulf of mexico oil spill in april 2010. have your energy habits changed over the years, what do you think about this? we want to hear from you this morning. more polls. is it possible to reduce the effects of global warming? there may be disagreement over whether global warming exist, most, 74% of those who say there of risingvidence temperatures on earth believe it is possible to reduce the effects. just 23% say it is not possible. when asked if mayors are -- if be neededifices will
bengazhi. here's how you can tell us your 3880 four202-585- democrats -- we have this question posted on our facebook page. about 1000 participants giving their opinion. you can reach out to us via ,witter and send us an e-mail journal@c-span.org. the gallup poll was taken in september. media, showingws from 1999 to the present day. they have a great deal or fair amount of trust in the mass media. goings 40% in 2012 and back to solar numbers. 55% still saying they do not have very much trust in it or none at all. when it comes to news sources and their trust in the mass media. that is the cbs news story from this week. where'd you gather news from and how do you take it in and why do you trust it? us,ou want to reach out to the numbers are -- you can also follow us on facebook, posting their opinions, you can as well. i will give you a couple of snapshots of what they are saying. when it comes to sources, out jazeera, bbc,al and public tv. you can give your sources on the phones, on facebook, or on tweet and e-mail. from new jersey, democrats line, go ahead. my favorite news sources n
exercise rights of its owners and forth is a roots that only judge walton in the district here used which is the third-party standing doctrine. i would like to begin by looking at the claims of the gilardi's as individuals. several things are undisputed. the gilardi's control and make the decisions for the companies including what goes in and what's kept out of the company health plans. third the gilardi have a well-documented religious or four of the hhs mandate challenge here today requires the companies to include those things and their plans for face significant lines. and five those things should only be included in the plan if francis philip gilardi direct them to be included. given those undisputed facts it's our view that the court should have applied the test of the thomas case and asked whether the hhs mandate put substantial pressure on the gilardi's to modify their long-standing behavior and violate their religious police. the responses of course it does. they either abandon their religious belief that they can't have their company pay for these things or go out with business.
on and ratifying that it puts us in the addition to get the world to move in the direction so that tammy will be ablemark to travel anywhere and have a greater likelihood that they have the access to fulfill their god-given potential whether it is in a job, business, advocacy and they will be able to achieve. american businesses who already lead the world in terms of accessibility standards, that will be the standard that others adopt so that the football player from rutgers who has this able tolchair will be travel other places and will likely be having the other access. that is why the ratification of the treaty expands our reach and advocacy not simply by reflection of looking at with the united states does but its advocates. it's a very good question that has been raised and it deserves a full answer. >> chairman, could i offer a few -- cardin and we will get you to work it in. .- senator cardin >> i will try to leave you time. from the written statement which i think is a very appropriate. you should not be so proud to think that we could not learn from other countries about how to
allowed us to see that. >> in 2011 virginia tech teamed up with youth leagues to research young players as well. >> i don't think anyone expected the exposure numbers that we found. from the first grade to seven, 78-year-old teams, the average impacts is 150 per season per player, some 80 times the acceleration of gravity. >> can you do that five times again? >> 10-year-old ryan is a young player virginia tech is studying. he suffered a head injury in a running deal. dr mark rogers, a team physician for the hoekies is giving a follow up exam. >> eight to 10-year-olds are getting a lot of hits, some pretty good g-force. some of the hits are up to 100 gs. >> it's dangerous. >> it's high. a lot of stuff generates changes. they are not doing a lot of head to head contacts or hitting drills during the week. the fact that he may have had a concussion - does to give you reservations about football. >> when your children get injured it makes you think. as long as you have programs like this, where people are trying to help and making sure the kids stay as safe as approximately. i wouldn't hesit
living this program cause the u.s. house is about a gavel in and members will start their legislative day and hold one minute speeches on any topic. legislative work starts at 5:00 eastern. members will debate by bills including one to create a website to list all government any votes requested will take place at 6:30 eastern. now, live to the house for. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. loving and gracious god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. help us this day to draw closer to you so that with your spirit and aware of your presence among us, we may all face the tasks of this day. bless the members of the people's house. help them to think clearly, speak confidently and act courageously in the belief that all noble service is based upon patience, truth and love. may they be great enough to be humble and good enough to keep their faith always regarding public office as a sacred trust. give them the courage and the wisdom to fail not their fellow ci
. a major development only on abc7 news. >> reporter: sources cross to the investigation tell us they solved the mystery of the man who says he saw a person presumably lynn spalding at the bottom of a locked stairwell. now, everybody has been looking for this man, who reported what he saw october 4th, two weeks after spalding vanished from her hospital bed he told the nurse he saw the person lying on the stairs between three ready and 4th floors then, he left quickly the nursing supervisor notified a sheriff deputy to check it out. sheriff mirkarimi says deputies never did check that stairwell. the body was found four days later. the mystery person appears to be the only whoun saw the body during her long disappearance and gators have been looking for him, hoping he can provide answers our sources tell us that the man is a doctor. a visiting doctor from india, working at ucsf in san francisco general. at 6:00 tonight we'll tell you more of what we've learned and why the doctor finally came forward. >> now to police protest about to get underway. some residents in san francisco sa
typically used on the golf course -- gulf coast and those have begun to export refined products into latin america and south america. so it's all about building an infrastructure to connect the production to the consumption. the pipeline transportation is the most efficient and cost-effective way to do that long run. >> host: with all that laying on the table at me turn to viewers. her couple of tweets, one from jody who says there is a whole new industry for renewable nonpolluting forms of energy. why are we scrapping the oil energy and we need or oil, more more gas and more more gas in more things to burn again. that's what makes this economy grow. democratic grow. democratic caller you are up next. go ahead. >> caller: good morning. hearing about how the oil is getting around and they willes on line in logan county are getting oil and gas and i know they are building some gas collection pipelines. where's the gas going around the country? >> guest: in a similar process we typically talk casually about oil or natural gas production but in reality a lot of it is mixed production. at the t
to start reducing infrastructure and major acquisition programs, i think you give us an answer to the second half. can you go to the first half of that question? were able to scramble around to a significant degree in 2013. are you going to be able to rely on those kind of temporary measures if sequestration continues into 2014? , thank you, chairman. as he put it very well, scrambled in 2013 to come up with the dollars to meet our sequestration marks, there are things that we did that frankly mortgaged our future. we had to take money out of two places, one is readiness. we stopped training. we stopped sending individuals to be prepared at the national training center. a you can never recapture that. what that does is delay the buildup of future readiness. we will have to pay that price somewhere down the road. we simply cannot ever get that back. although we were able to do it for one year, it comes at our risk to respond, our risk to do a contingency. riskis really incredible that i am not comfortable with and the second pieces we had to furlough individuals who work is and
at this hour: texas anti-abortion advocates got a temporary victory. the u.s. supreme court agreed to keep tough abortion plans in place while they are being appeal. it requires to have abortion doctors to have admittance privilege in new by hospitals. >> voters in albuquerque rejected a band on late-term abortion. it is home to one of a handful of clinics that perform late-term abortions. >> president obama is under pressure over the healthcare law. reports say the admission new of website flaws last spring at a hearing on capitol hill the top official of the site said 30% is not yet built and republicans say healthcare.gov is a security risk for people trying to enrol. >> the federal government and jpmorgan reached a $30 billion settlement over toxic mortgage investments. it's a big deal of its kind. $4 billion of that money will be used for consumer relief. those are the headlines. "america tonight" is up next and you can get the latest on line at aljazeera.com. >>> on america america, day 11 in the daily fight for water, food, and shelter in the philippines. half a world away, people i
and humanities awards. it recognizes teachers and youth that uses art to uplift the lives of the nation's young people. each group gets $10,000. >>> ralph lauren, calvin klein, coach, some of the designers open in our area in a brand-new outlet mall. crowds of shoppers a a big deal. >>> you name dropper. is this a cougar like the post says? if not, what else could it be? >> your last chance, the deadline approaching tonight for the national zoo's new panda cub. >>> the virginia state senator who was seriously injured during an attack earlier this week in his home is home from the hospital. creigh deeds was stabbed tuesday by his 24-year-old son gus, who then shot himself to death. deeds thanked people for his support. he tweeted your friendship is important to me. >>> there's a picture circulating on facebook that has people asking, is there a cougar on the loose in spotsylvania county? they captured this pick chir of a cat-like creature. if you look closely, you can see it has no tail. it's the first clue it may not be a cougar. we checked with the virginia department of game and inland fisher
was able to be used at the time. you had the oil fields blossoms say 1914-1918 period. at its peak producing 300,000 barrels a day accounting for almost one in every five barrels produced in oklahoma and almost 5% of total u.s. marketed production. it was really just a field.cant booming oil you often think about it, i think about it in modern accounts of what north dakota is experiencing. think about this boom in cushing, as we have had previous successful fields to our north and east between cushing and tulsa, and so as the boom moved its way really became a drilling exploration focused town. the production just far outpaced what could be consumed and it became a gnat ral thought to begin building storage facilities, pipeline gathering facilities, and that so the nascent stages of the nod rn infrastructure that sits behind us this morning. host: what part does it play today in the oil industry? guest: the cushing hub is still violetly important. you think about -- vitally important. think about it, it is a marketplace, it is the marketplace, the benchmark price setting place for
the suspect being under arrest. techknow is next. follow us on al jazeera.com. . >>> hello and welcome. i'm phil torres, we'll talk about innovations that will change laughs. we'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to look at technology to test helmets and track hits on college and youth players. let's take a look. . >>
to do and how it's going to affect us here. we've got to remember that so many passengers, tens and thousands of connect through o'hare. whatever happens through the country ripples through this airport. we have 3 million people traveling across the nation and the busiest days of travel are going to be tomorrow and sunday. you're going to want to leave a little extra time if you're traveling on those days. it's probably a good idea if you're not traveling, leave a few extra minutes in your schedule. >> we will keep that in mind. thank you so much for that. we'll also keep watching the system as people start their thanksgiving travel. see you soon. cycling now, the crowd is ready for president obama at dreamworks animation in glendale, california. company's owned by one of the top fundraisers but industry has created 4100 jobs in the past month alone. nbc's peter alexander is traveling with the president. this is being billed as an economic speech. do you think he'll probably touch on immigration as well? >> reporter: yeah, he has touched on immigration as he did yesterday in san
morning when when when when when when. the rta that election day twenty thirty hear us from new york city to miami beach unconventional candidates are shaking up the usual red vs blue politics in depth coverage of today's elections. just ahead and in washington state there's a major vote on labeling gmo foods. this initiative passes it would force biotech manufacturers to disclose the use of genetically modified crops more on a boat for greater transparency coming up. not in colorado there's an initiative to divide the state's eleven counties in northeast colorado will vote on whether or not to secede. so were the chances of a fifty first state to play more later in the show i am. it's tuesday but work with five pm in washington dc and said saxon you're watching our tea. then we began with election day twenty thirty. that's right political junkies around the country can rejoice because big name elections are just reserved for even numbered years. they happen on aud never yours too. so let's take a look at the map the new jersey and in virginia voters head to the polls to elect a
decide to bring into the fold their friends and fellow activist, making many of us honor remembers of the family along the way. there selflessness has had an indelible impact upon me. in some small sense, it can be said that the davis family saved me and countless other abolitionists, human rights advocates, and close friends to learn critical life lessons from them now in turn it is our collective duty to make sure that troy's death was not in vain. we must do our part to save the world by continuing this fight to abolish the death penalty state-by-state and execution by execution. nobody is better placed than they to say why it this is so critical, so i am humbled, proud and honored to introduce troy's middle sister kimberly davis and his and his sister ebony and her daughter, kristin, whom you will hear from later this evening. please join me in welcoming cam. [applause] [applause] >> good evening. i wanted thank you all for coming out on this great event because, as you know, tomorrow will mark the 2-year anniversary of my brothers execution. it has been a long battle, long str
stories: texas antiabortion advocates got a temporary victim. the u.s. supreme court agreed to keep tough abortion restrictions in place while they are being repealed. the rule requires abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital. it goes before a federal appeals court in january. >> the health care rollout is causing headaches for the barack obama administration. healthcare.gov is a security risk, say republicans, for people trying to enrom. the administration knew of the flaws. at a hearing on capitol hill, the top official said 30% of the site is not built. >> the talk show with rob ford and his brother has been cancel. he declared war on city council members after they cut his budget, strim the mayor of most of his powers. ford's he'll run again. "america tonight" is next. i'm john siegenthaler, see you back here tomorrow. you can always get the latest on aljazeera.com. ♪ >>> on america america, day 11 in the daily fight for water, food, and shelter in the philippines. half a world away, people in the midwest figure out their next steps in the wake of sunday's deadly
from oregon. >> well i think this is a terrific vote for the u.s. senate. we have had a form of paralysis that has afflicted this institution and it has done great disservice to the american people. >> reporter: three democrats voted with republicans yesterday, carl levin of michigan, joe manchin of west virginia and mark pryor of arkansas. levin expressed concern this could lead to more changes in the senate. >> when the precedent is set, that a majority of this body can change the rules at will, which is what majority did today, if it can be changed on judges, or on other nominees, this precedent is going to be used, i fear, to change the rules on consideration of legislation. >> reporter: for now the obama administration will get federal judges approved more quickly. if there is need for cabinet shuffle, it will be easier to appoint new people to the posts. at some points when democrats are out of power, republican leaders are warning they will regret this move. patti ann? jenna: mike emanuel, live in washington, thanks. jon: while the filibuster rule change in the senate
motors gives an update on the u.s. auto industry. host: good morning. a live view of the u.s. capitol as the rain continues in the east. with congress and recess this week for the thanksgiving holiday, it is a getaway wednesday as millions toward planes, trains, and drive to your destination. of the busieste travel days of the year. we want to focus on the terminals, the roads and the rail lines but carry freight and passengers. this question, is america's transportation infrastructure up to 21st-century first century standards. that is the question this morning. as always, you can join in on the conversation. you can also join us on facebook or send us an e-mail or send us a tweet. this is the headline this morning, front page of " the wall street journal" -- we want to focus on the larger issue of transportation infrastructure. earlier this month the president traveling to the port orleans, saying it is time to spend more money. >> one in nine of our bridges is rated structurally deficient. more than 40% of the major highways are congested. so is our airspace. who is sittin
tell us why -- you can go on youtube and you have more disclosure, more accountability, and a lot more knowledge in any of the public outcries, radio, whatever. what i would like to ask -- do you think there was a conspiracy with john f. kennedy and the corruption between j edgar hoover and a cia cabinet member going on at the same time. president kennedy was trying to break down the secret organization and all the secrecy going on in the background. he was set up -- the next thing you know, the man was assassinated. it becomes history. guest: it may be that you have been watching oliver stone's movie, too often. my personal opinion is there was no conspiracy. that is not a popular opinion with some people. i have looked into it. i've read the warren commission. i've read books on it. that is just my personal opinion. we may never know the truth, but on the face of it, it appears it is what the majority of people think that there was a lone assassin. host: back to your piece in the "smithsonian." how did you come across this story? guest: i cannot talk about that. [laughter] a source i
of u.s. electricity generation based on 2012 figures. renewable makes up about 12% of our electricity, nuclear 19%, natural gas 30%, and coal about 37%. and then of course we've all heard the stories about production in the united states. here's one from reuters that came out the beginning of october. then the "wall street journal" had a similar story about the united states overtaking russia. and they had this chart in their paper recently. take a look at where it's been and where it's going. claire mor, oklahoma, caller: thank you for c-span and thank you for taking my call. my comment is i believe we need a lot more solar focus. host: why is that? caller: well, although i'm a chemical engineer and i make my living and livelyhood in the petroleum and chemical industry, just for several reasons. ing out the fact that -- host: sir what do you do in claire more? caller: i'm a chemical engineer. host: for what company? caller: for a consulting, engineering consulting. host: where is clairemore, oklahoma? guest: just north of tulsa. host: we're focusing on cushing. are you familiar with
>>> the u.s. supreme court refuses to block the strict texas abortion law. opponents say it will prevent clinics in the state from performing the procedure. a ban on late term abortions is defeated in new mexico's largest city. voters in albuquerque rejected the measure closely watched as a front in the national abortion battle >> calling it a message of blood and death to iran and hezbollah. an al qaeda group taking responsibility for the suicide bombing in beirut. the blast killing 23 people, including a senior irani doipt. >> and desperately needed aid arrives on an island in the philippines where 80% of the people have been left homeless by typhoon haiyan. >> good morning, and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. two decisions in the battle over abortion rights - both with major implications. the supreme court ruled against blocking a restrictive abortion law in texas - at least while it's being repeople. a third of the clinics will have to stay closed. in new mexico voters in albuquerque reject a ban on late-term abortion. in texas - it was a plea to the
shared his vision in this land and abroad, he had said two months ago to the united nations, let us complete what we have started for as the scripttures tell us, no man who puts his hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of god. at this time of sorrow and burden, he would have us remember the passages from joshua and isaiah, he had used in accepting the presidential nomination. be strong and of good courage. be not afraid neither be thou dismayed. shall renew their strength. they shall point with wings of eagle and run and not be weary. finally, in his last hours, president kennedy had prepared these words for dallas and for the nation, the rich -- righteous of our clause must always underlie our strength. for as was written long ago, accept the lord, guard the city, the guard watches in vain. the following is one of his favorite passages from scripture from the book of aclose -- the third chapter. there's an appointed time for everything, and a time for every affair under the heaives. d "issue" heavens. a time to be born, and a time to die, a time to plant and a tim
for several deaths in the u.s. rolled up the eastern seaboard today, threatening to snarl thanksgiving travel. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. also ahead this tuesday, the bloody civil war in syria. the main rebel group announced it will skip upcoming peace talks and vowed to keep up the battle against president bashar al-assad's forces. >> ifill: and our thanksgiving week series on food continues with a profile of award-winning cookbook writer paula wolfert, now caught between her love of food and her battle with alzheimer's. >> i can't remember what i read i know what the dish is supposed to taste like, i just don't remember the amounts. i can't... i can't remember. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these in
to dallas. they're telling us that we're on time, which is great. the roads are a little slick so we wanted to get extra time to get through security. >> reporter: were you expecting to be able to leave on time? >> i was not expecting to leave on time. in fact i was thinking i'd be lucky if i got out tonight. >> reporter: it looks like everything is going to be fine for you. >> looking good so far. fingers crossed. >> reporter: lucky you, right? >> so far. >> reporter: so far most of the travelers are like maura. we just spoke with one person who had an hour delay. coming into la guardia is a much different story, an hour delay coming in. in philly it's about a two-hour delay coming in but the outbound flights are looking pretty decent. now let's head to tom costello who's in pittsburgh. tom? >> reporter: katy, thank you. here in pittsburgh we've got somewhere in the neighborhood of an inch or 2 on the ground here in terms of snow. we had some freezing rain and also some sleet over the course of the past 24 hours, but at the moment most of that has subsided now. it is, however, very cold. p
'm elisabeth hasselbeck. 10,000 people are feared dead after a typhoon in the philippines. -l this morning u.s. troops are on the ground henning piece together the damage. where is the storm headed next? stay here for details. >> days after a second-term winner, new jersey governor chris christie goes on an all-out media blitz slamming the obamacare debacle. >> anybody who has run anything in their lives could see this coming a mile away. >> more on the jersey governor's advice for the white house. like they'll listen. >> miley cyrus sparking more controversy at another awards show. >> you know, i couldn't put this award in my bag, but i did find this. so thank you guys very much. >> how her latest performance goes up in smoke. "fox & friends," new week, special day starts now. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> what a treat on this veterans day morning. you're waking up to the hell cats. it's an ensemble of buglers and drummers from the west point band. >> some of our favorite people from one of our favorite places on one of our favorite dates, to honor those who served this great nation. >> the official nat
for hundreds of residents standing in front of debris where they used to live. >> it's just hard to believe. it's almost like can i wake up now? it's almost like a nightmare. >> reporter: on monday survivors of sunday's tornados and heavy storms which ravaged communities in 12 states returned to washington, illinois to scrape up what they could and figure out what is next. >> my neighbor found my daughter's journal she kept as a kid. so we will be looking for bits and pieces today. >> reporter: the five-mile wide twister that cut through washington is dozens reported in illinois slamming into dozens of communities like where an elderly brother and sitter were killed and relatives are coping with the loss of their home and that of their loved ones. >> we were planning on a thanksgiving down here and amy bought the turkey and uncle joe was going to fry a turkey down here and all looking forward to that. >> reporter: the southern illinois city of brook port suffered its share of loss as well, 50 homes were levelled or gone entirely. and an effort all night search and rescue of three fatalities a
's murder. in sanford for us this morning, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, facing felony aggravated assault as well as other charges, police spent hours going through the home he shares with his girlfriend as they try to figure out exactly what happened. >> what's going on? >> he's in my house, breaking all my [ bleep ] stuff because i asked him to leave. he has a freaking gun, breaking all my stuff right now. >> reporter: that's the 911 call that police say george zimmerman's girlfriend made during a domestic incident that turned violent. >> you put your gun in my freaking face and told me to get the [ bleep ] out. this is not your house. no. get out of here. >> reporter: the woman told the 911 operator she was pushed out of her house by zimmerman and that he had a shotgun, ar-15, and two handguns inside. she also said the fight started after she had asked the 30-year-old to leave. but zimmerman tells a different story in his own 911 call. >> my girlfriend, for lack of a better word, is going crazy on me. >> reporter: police were already at the house when zimmerman made the call. h
can be used in the execution. >>> those are the headlines. "america tonight" is up next. i'm john siegenthaler in new york. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern, 8:00 pacific time. and you can always get the latest on aljazeera.com. we'll see you later on tonight. ♪ ♪ >>> on america america, day 11 in the daily fight for water, food, and shelter in the philippines. half a world away, people in the midwest figure out their next steps in the wake of sunday's deadly storms. also tonight, cruel and unusual? the debate over missouri's new lethal injection formula suspends the execution of a serial killer. >> you are in grave danger of causing an execution which could be torturous. >>> and there guns to god is the nsa program chilling our most basic rights as americans? >> the fact there's a record being kept of who is in my group and who is not in my group is very chilling. >>> we are hearing from people who say we left our countries to escape government surveillance and now you are telling us that we're not safe. ♪ >>> good evening, everyone and thanks for joining us. joie ch
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